Mr. Scrooge (Columbus Children’s Theatre – Columbus, OH)

I wonder just how many adaptations there are of Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol for the stage as well as on film. I know there are several different musicalizations of the story, created by talents as diverse as Alan Menken (the 1994 stage version, which was made into a 2004 TV movie starring Kelsey Grammar) and Leslie Bricusse (as Scrooge!, the 1970 film starring Albert Finney, which was subsequently adapted for the stage). And there are films of the story starring George C. Scott, Alastair Sim, Jim Carrey, and even Scrooge McDuck! Perhaps playing the greedy and cantankerous Ebenezer is a rite of passage for many performers, as one has to age into the role to be suitable to play it.

 

Photo: Cynthia DeGrand – (left to right) Dayton Duvall (Jacob Marley) and William Goldsmith (Ebenezer)
 
Columbus Children’s Theatre now presents their version of this classic story as Mr. Scrooge, in an adaptation written by their artistic director William Goldsmith (who plays Ebenezer) and with songs by Janet Yates Vogt and Mark Friedman. With a running time of around an hour and a cast full of lively children, this version of the familiar story of the stingy Ebenezer Scrooge and how his attitude towards people and life changes after visits from several ghosts on Christmas Eve is a strong alternative to some of the heavier variations of this tale to be found elsewhere this season.

 

Photo: Cynthia DeGrand
 
The action takes place in front of a set representing the front of a stone building with doors, windows, and passageways. At times this is the front of Scrooge’s home, at other times the interior, and sometimes it is just another home in the background where action takes place out on the street, all delineated with some excellent lighting effects by Derryck Menard. The large cast mingles in character with the audience as they enter and take their seats, noted as the “Nicholas Nickleby motif” in the program; this helps not only adults get into the spirit of the piece but also eases new, young theatregoers gently into the experience. Though a musical, the songs are usually quite brief and the dancing limited to appropriate moments only. The scenes involving the ghosts are handled very lightly and are a bit eerie without being disturbing or too intense; this is a family show, after all. My favorite scene is the number “Ebenezer Scrooge,” where the grumpy businessman is encircled by chanting children that he is attempting to shoo away. The children in this show are many and know their parts well; they are never cloying or overly cute at all, a blessing to those of us with a low tolerance for that kind of saccharine.

 

Photo: Cynthia DeGrand – William Goldsmith (Ebenezer)
 
William Goldsmith is fine and reserved as Ebenezer Scrooge, firm in his resolve as the play begins but susceptible to melting as the piece goes on. It’s a difficult balancing act to allow for that transition to occur and feel unplanned, but Mr. Goldsmith handles it quite well. He doesn’t come off as a stereotype like so many other Scrooges that I’ve seen; he plays the part earnestly without exaggeration. Mr. Goldsmith’s Ebenezer reminds me of that persnickety far right conservative relative who posts rhetoric on Facebook that makes you roll your eyes, but you can’t unfriend or block him for fear of the repercussions it might cause. He is surrounded by a solid cast, including the humorously intense Dayton Duvall as the ghost of Jacob Marley.

 

Photo: Cynthia DeGrand – (left to right) Jennifer Feather-Youngblood (Ghost of Christmas Present) and William Goldsmith (Ebenezer)
 
Jennifer Feather-Youngblood is a major standout, turning in a riotous performance as the Ghost of Christmas Present, joyfully romping around in her Santa-like robe, wreath atop her head, with a jug of spirits in tow. Ms. Feather-Youngblood injects some good old vitamin B-12 into the proceedings when she appears and, as capable as the rest of the performers are, she’s a difficult act to follow and is missed when her character departs.

 

Photo: Cynthia DeGrand – Abby Zeszotek (Mrs. Dilber)
 
There is one character and sequence in this adaptation that I don’t quite understand, and that is of Mrs. Dilber played by Abby Zeszotek. Mrs. Dilber is Ebenezer’s rather shiesty housekeeper who is missing a front tooth and steals some of his silverware. Ms. Zeszotek is quite funny and gruff with a cockney accent in the part (the audience gave an guttural “yech!” when she dished out gruel), but her character and scene go nowhere; Ebenezer doesn’t catch her stealing or confront her about it, and at the end of the play he is generous and kind to her. The impression given is that it is okay to steal as long as you aren’t caught and if the person that you’re pilfering from is stingy anyway.

 

Photo: Cynthia DeGrand
 

Mr. Scrooge is overall a sweet, family-friendly show that tells its story succinctly and with charm. The environment at Columbus Children’s Theatre is one that is quite pro family and children, which is sometimes rather difficult to find in the theatre scene around Columbus. I’ve seen adaptations of A Christmas Carol that run more than twice as long as this one and aren’t half as good. You don’t need to bring kids along to enjoy this one.

*** out of ****

Mr. Scrooge continues through to December 20th in Columbus Children’s Theatre located at 512 Park Street in downtown Columbus, and more information can be found at http://www.columbuschildrenstheatre.org/mr-scrooge.html

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