The Oldest Profession (Eclipse Theatre Company – Worthington, OH)

Photo: Greg Smith – (left to right) Kathy Sturm (Edna), Terry Sullivan (Lillian), Linda Browning (Mae), Tobi Gerber (Vera), and Linda Goodwin (Ursula)

Where does one begin when starting a new theatre company? Should one start with a modern classic by Tennessee Williams, something by Shaw or Ibsen, perhaps a well-known musical? Or how about opening with something off the beaten path, something interesting and fresh that the area has likely never seen before. Eclipse Theatre Company’s premiere production is of Paula Vogel’s The Oldest Profession, a quirky and entertaining show with plenty of laughter and heart, definitely a standard deviation from anything else currently being performed in or around Columbus.

 

Photo: Mel Buehl – (left to right) Linda Goodwin (Ursula), Terry Sullivan (Lillian), Tobi Gerber (Vera), Linda Browning (Mae), and Kathy Sturm (Edna)
 

The Oldest Profession is about a group of aging prostitutes struggling to remain relevant in New York, a city that is beginning to change at the dawn of the 1980s. These five women have been in “the life” for over fifty years, harkening back to the days of Prohibition in the late 1920s, which would put most of them in their seventies (or older). These women may look like quaint, blinged-out grandmas (whatever you do, don’t call them that!) with their overstuffed hair and painted faces, but they are rather refined ladies for hire with an ever dwindling clientele. These aren’t your typical streetwalkers turning tricks in alleys for drugs; these are women who want to bring joy to their gentlemen callers while supporting themselves. The changing economics of the time are reflected in how they live their lives and run their business, demonstrating how living in a city teetering on the brink of bankruptcy effects everyone. The program has a quaint glossary of terms printed on the back along with a short essay putting the story into historical context. I’m not sure anyone could misinterpret the meaning behind “dip his wick,” though some of the French euphemisms were helpful to know. Still, I don’t think “poontang” means hooker; I’m pretty sure it means any piece of female action one can get.

 

Photo: Greg Smith – (left to right) Kathy Sturm (Edna) and Linda Browning (Mae)
 
Standouts in the cast are Kathy Sturm as Edna, the big earner of the group with heels to match; Linda Goodwin as Ursula, the Republican hooker, as cold as one would expect; and Terry Sullivan as Lillian, the theatre cat, always up for a good time out among the footlights. Linda Browning as Mae, the madam, has some strong moments, particularly one in which she defends her turf against some new trade. Tobi Gerber as Vera, the somewhat dim and gullible member of the group, has one of the best lines in the piece: “I’m gonna scratch her snatch!” The actresses interact well with each other, and if there are a few pregnant pauses here and there or a few false starts with their line delivery, it all somehow works. These are elderly women the performers are playing after all, though I was surprised at how youthful they each appeared sans wig and heavy makeup after the performance.

 

Photo: Mel Buehl – (left to right) Linda Goodwin (Ursula), Terry Sullivan (Lillian), Tobi Gerber (Vera), and Kathy Sturm (Edna)
 
A nice element of the rather unconventional performance space Eclipse Theatre Company has secured is how intimate it all feels. The area is draped into a square, and there are only fifty seats located directly in front and to the left and right of the action. There isn’t a bad seat to be had, and the acoustics are perfect for allowing each word to be heard with little to no apparent amplification. Greg Smith’s set consists of a bench in front of a black iron gate bridged by stone pillars and streetlights with a mostly full trash bin off to the side and a concrete floor complete with some gum residue; what more is needed to illustrate the perimeter of a park? Mr. Smith also directs this piece, inserting an intermission about forty-five minutes into the play where it was designed to be performed in one continuous 105-minute stretch. The break occurs at a decent enough spot save for making the second act a quarter hour longer than the first, but it isn’t a problem. These ladies are worth the time.

 

Photo: Mel Buehl – (left to right) Linda Goodwin (Ursula), Terry Sullivan (Lillian), Tobi Gerber (Vera), and Linda Browning (Mae)
 

The Oldest Profession is laugh-out-loud funny as these feisty old women argue, debate, and talk business about things women a third of their age would probably be too embarrassed to discuss. It’s also terribly poignant as these women one by one pass on, the real heartbreak is discovering which will be the one who’s left behind. This is an R-rated show to be sure, but it isn’t as expletive-laden as one might expect. These are ladies, after all, the last vestiges of a bygone era that ended during the ’80s when Ronald Reagan was president and New York City began its transformation into the tourist-friendly (though arguably character-less) landmark it is today.

*** out of ****

The Oldest Profession continues through May 1st at 670 Lakeview Plaza Blvd, Suite F, Worthington (less than 30 minutes from downtown Columbus), and more information can be found at http://eclipsetheatrecompany.org/

   

   
  
 

Advertisements

Nice Work If You Can Get It (Weathervane Playhouse – Newark, OH)

Nice Work If You Can Get It premiered on Broadway in 2012 and ran for just over a year. With a book by Joe DiPietro taking inspiration from works by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse, Nice Work If You Can Get It was created in order to create a show around songs from the George and Ira Gershwin songbook while they were still under copyright and able to generate royalties for the estate. The story created to fit around the songs involves a trio of bootleggers hiding booze in the presumed vacant apartment of a Manhattan playboy at the height of Prohibition. Throw in a spoiled socialite, a crusading Prohibitionist, and a rather dizzy Senator, add dancing and that great Gershwin music, and you wind up with this delightful production that closes the summer Weathervane Playhouse season.

 

Photo: Adam Karsten – Patrick Clements and Molly Griggs
 
Patrick Clements is the rich but rather spoiled and flighty Jimmy Winter. All he really has to do is show up and be handsome and suave, but that wouldn’t be much of a challenge for Mr. Clements; he dances like a fiend and proves himself adept at physical comedy. His voice is velvety and warm, proving that he is a real triple threat. I would think he would be perfect casting for a farce like Noises Off at some point once he’s done wooing all the ladies as the lead in every other show.

Molly Griggs is Billie Bendix, the bootlegger destined to fall in love with Jimmy. Ms. Griggs is perfectly sweet in the role though the part comes off as underwritten to me. She gives off a good sense of camaraderie with her fellow bootleggers in the play, and once again she wears her period garb well. I just wish she had more of the kind of funny moments reserved for the supporting cast in the show.

 

Photo: Chad DiBlasio (diblasiophoto.com)
 
Kayla Walsh is pure trouble as spoiled Eileen Evergreen, and she milks every moment for all that it’s worth. This show is one that gives all the best moments to the supporting characters, and Ms. Walsh pounces on each moment she has to draw attention to herself. She steals every scene, but the book appears to be written with that as the intent. She frolics in a bathtub then slips through a trap door in the bottom to emerge elsewhere on stage headlining the song “Delishious,” the title of which may just as well apply to Ms. Walsh as it does her character. I can see her playing Vera Charles in Mame, or even Rose in Gypsy at some point.

Ms. Walsh’s co-star Ryan Metzger would be a perfect Herbie to her Rose, if any theatrical producers out there are reading this. Mr. Metzger plays Cookie McGee, one of the trio of bootleggers in the play. He masquerades as a butler for most of the story, saying all of the kinds of things people in service would love to say but wouldn’t for fear of getting fired. But Cookie isn’t really a butler, so he can really dish out the zingers and sarcastic remarks because he just doesn’t care, and Mr. Metzger is the perfect person to deliver them. His timing is down and voice carries just the right kind of intonation that can generate laughter even if you didn’t quite get what he said; you would know that it was funny just by the way it sounded, and so you laugh. Sure, the script gave him the lines, but it takes someone like Mr. Metzger to hit them out of the park.

Layne Roate plays Duke Mahoney, the third member of Billie’s bootlegging trio. Mr. Roate plays the wan and mopey secondary part with great skill even though he doesn’t have a lot of material from which to work. I really felt sorry for him when he was thrust into pretending to be a cook, perhaps because I can’t cook and having to make a large meal like he did would’ve caused me to break out. He has a kind of helplessness in the part that is endearing rather than annoying as it could’ve been had it been approached differently. After seeing Mr. Roate in four productions this summer at Weathervane Playhouse, I definitely think this was his best performance.

Other notable performances are by Rebecca Keck as the domineering pro-Prohibition crusader Estonia Dulworth, and Barbe Helwig as Millicent Winter, who arrives near the end of the show, revealing a secret that stops everyone in their tracks. The only slightly sore spot is Kirk Paisley as Senator Max Evergreen. Mr. Paisley knows his lines and his blocking, but he seems to be listening for his cues rather than listening to what the characters around him are saying. He seems to express only one emotion – that of surprise – and so I didn’t buy that he was really interested so much in what was going on. It’s not like he wrecked the play; he just stood out against all of the terrific performances going on around him

 

Photo: Chad DiBlasio (diblasiophoto.com) – Scenic design by Jeremy Hollis
 
Jeremy Hollis’s set is impressive in size and design, opulent enough to pass for an upper class apartment but slightly off-kilter to be just right for some of the zany events in the plot. Some of the design embellishments aren’t perfectly symmetrical, and they shouldn’t be; this was an apartment that was rarely used and probably due for an overhaul anyhow. It still looks quite fancy and of the elite, however, and the way that the bathtub and has been integrated to serve the machinations of the story is quite impressive. As struck as I was by Mr. Hollis’s set for Dial “M” For Murder, this one is even better, laid out in such a way that every seat in the house is a good one for seeing the action.

 

Photo: Chad DiBlasio (diblasiophoto.com)
 
Karen Sieber’s choreography is quite athletic and highly polished, definitely not for the faint of heart to tackle. She puts the cast through its paces with some tap routines that are quite engaging yet indicative of the period, and the cast seems to be having a grand time dancing up a storm rather than showing exhaustion like most of the audience would be were we to have to attempt the same feats. This is the kind of dancing that commands attention and applause, and Ms. Sieber is to be congratulated.

 

Photo: Chad DiBlasio (diblasiophoto.com) – Patrick Clements and Molly Griggs
 
Director Adam Karsten has a firm grasp on this material and keeps the action moving at a brisk pace. Mr. Karsten artfully navigates that often tenuous transition to song from dialogue, and he keeps the tone light and cheerful. As a result, Nice Work If You Can Get It emerges as a real crowd pleaser, and one of the better examples of the “jukebox musical” genre. Perhaps this work is better than most jukebox musicals because most (if not all) of the Gershwin songs included were showtunes already, having been in shows of the day and popularized as standards since. People of all ages are familiar with quite a few of the songs already from their use in films and commercials; they aren’t “plot” songs like in most of the shows we have now, so the audience can just enjoy them rather than listen carefully for things pertinent to the story.

The audience at the performance I attended was engaged throughout and was having a grand time, as did I; there isn’t much more you can ask for in a production this inspired.

***/ out of ****

Nice Work If You Can Get It continues through to August 8th at the Weathervane Playhouse at 100 Price Road in Newark, OH (around 45 minutes outside Columbus), and more information can be found at http://weathervaneplayhouse.org/weathervane-playhouses-2015-summer-season/nice-work-can-get/